About your Search

20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2
parts of the country this year. superstorm sandy ripped through the northeast in late october, leaving a trail of damage along the way. the storm racked up damage of around $60 billion, making it the second most expensive storm ever for the u.s., following hurricane katrina. the storm destroyed houses and businesses on the east coast, leaving millions without power. just months earlier, crop prices shot up following a massive drought that hit the midwest and some northern states. weeks without rain sent corn and soybean prices sky-high. it was estimated that the drought was the worst in nearly a quarter of a century. 2012 was not without its controvesies. trading scandals rocked the news, highlighted by jpmorgan chase. the big bank lost more than $2 billion in what was called "a trading debacle." ceo jamie dimon took a trip to capitol hill for a testimony where he told senators that the industry needs "strong regulation, not always more." meanwhile, at chick-fil-a, the ceo of the popular chain cooked up trouble with some very public comments opposing gay marriage. the comments created
christmas. this storm is going to be terrible, and superstorm sandy had to have depressed sales if you consider what kind of damage was done to new york and new jersey. > i was reading about that. the mid-atlantic and northeast account for 24% of all retail sales in the u.s. that is a huge chunk of sales. > > absolutely huge, and that is going to put a big impact on sales. if you are spending your money getting your house fixed up and waiting for the insurance company to pay you back, that is absolutely going to affect retail sales. > i was looking at some of the companies out there: urban outfitters, tiffany's, macy's, wal-mart, target, all down. did they not see this coming? were they too optimistic? > > i think the fiscal cliff made a much bigger difference than people realize. if the average consumer is looking at somewhere between a $500 and $2500 increase in taxes next year, it is going to change their behavior, just like it changed company behaviors when you saw them accelerate their dividends. so, when the government goes and changes behavior, it is going to affect things like
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2